Day Pond State Park

2 05 2018

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(Text from the DEEP site)

The pond, which is the central feature of the park, was originally constructed by a pioneering family named Day. The water from the pond turned a large overshot waterwheel that powered the “up and down saw” of the family sawmill. Park visitors today will find only stone foundations as reminders of those colonial times. Day Pond is an attractive area for fishermen since the pond is stocked with trout. It was established as a park in 1949.

IMG_5041To begin the geologic exploration of the Day Pond, cross the dam, and then follow the blue trail to the left. The abundance of boulders in the woods indicate this area is covered with till, the unsorted material left behind by the glaciers. Till contains grain sizes from microscopic clay grains to boulders as large as houses. Till is generally found on the hilltops, while stratified drift is found in the valleys, where heavy melt water from the glaciers sorted the materials into deposits of similar sized grains. Natural sand and gravel deposits thus occur in valleys.

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Wake-robin/Red Trillium

 

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The Quaint

 

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The Ugly

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Rewarded with lunch!! Chili dog and whitefish sandwich. Yum.

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6 responses

2 05 2018
Robin

Wake-robin?

2 05 2018
Beth Lapin

Yup, that’s one of its common names… you need some?!

3 05 2018
Karen Hume

Hi Beth. I read that you lead hiking groups and, from this post, you clearly know your stuff about the history of the areas where you hike. What I wonder is where/how you learn the depth of info that you possess. Are State parks well researched so that you can learn by reading or is there more learning on the job when doing this kind of work?

7 05 2018
Beth Lapin

Recent posts from state parks include history taken from the website for that park — indicated with a link at the top of each blog.

4 05 2018
AJ Blythe

Hi Beth, I’m working my way through the other 13 of Karen’s “no longer strangers” post. I love bushwalking and your hike looks like it was through lovely terrain.

7 05 2018
Beth Lapin

I think our terrain is a bit different than yours!!

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