Middletown Hero: Major General Maurice Rose

19 02 2018

Maurice Rose signA year or so ago, a sign went up on Route 9 as it passed north through my town, Middletown, CT. A section of the road was dedicated to the memory of Major General Maurice Rose. I decided to find out more.

Maurice Rose birthplace plaqueMaurice Rose was born in Middletown in 1899; a plaque marks the location on Main Street. When he was four, his family moved to Denver. Rose was determined to join the military and served in both World War I and II.

MauriceRose wiki

It was in 1944 in Germany, after multiple medals and heroic accomplishments, that Rose was shot by the Germans. His initial grave was later moved to the Netherlands.

In his memory, the following are named after him: a school in the Netherlands, a hospital in Denver, a Jewish War Veterans Post 51 in Middletown, and the Middletown Armed Forces Reserve Center.

Maurice Rose colleague Bob SwirskyThe most remarkable occurrence at a recent presentation about Rose by Post 51’s Karen Uberti was the arrival of a WWII colleague. Almost ninety-eight year old Bob Swarsky arrived by wheelchair, maneuvered by his friend Glenn, to tell of his personal recollections of the day that Rose was killed. With hearing and mental agility that surpassed most of us in the room, Swarsky spoke about many efforts of the 3rd Armored Division, First Army.

Maurice Rose display at JWV51As those who served during that time get fewer and fewer, it becomes even more important and poignant to hear their stories and honor their memories.

Advertisements




TWO BOOKS BY CT AUTHORS

16 02 2018

hOMEGROWN TERROR

Growing up in New London, we were taught the story of Benedict Arnold, his burning of the town, and the slaughter in Groton across the river, year after year. I thought our teachers were a bit self-aggrandizing until I heard Eric Lehman’s presentation on his new book, Homegrown Terror: Benedict Arnold and the Burning of New London. Lehman dramatically analyzes Arnold’s motives for his change in allegiance from the newly emerging United States back to England. Perhaps he was not a true traitor, but apparently Arnold was driven purely by greed, not conviction or values, to betray many friends and colleagues. This is a well-documented portrayal of events during this time.

 

 

Setting the Stage:  What We Do, How We Do It, and Why is a combination text book and memoir by David Hays, a prolific stage designer and founder of the National Theater for the Deaf. An engaging storyteller, Hays shares tips and mistakes to those interested in theater.

Both books are published by Wesleyan Press.





TWO ART SHOWS: MIDDLETOWN, CT

12 02 2018

IMG_4449Loud live music ricocheting down the stairs and out into the street, the hubbub of many conversation, food and drink – in the LIBRARY (no ‘shhh’ here!!) It was the opening of Pierre Sylvain’s art show Fantastical Journey: voodoo, slavery jazz! at Middletown’s Russell Library. Pierre (who lives in Middletown with his wife, son, and daughter) is a Haitian native who paints about his home country, and the culture and music of African Americans in the United States. His styles and colors vary, but his passion and energy come through all his work. The paintings are on display in the main lobby and upstairs near the information desk through March 31 during regular Russell Library hours, 123 Broad Street, Middletown.

Womens art

Katherine Bradford

The space in the Zilkha gallery on Wesleyan University’s campus is currently housing paintings by six New York City women (Gina Beavers, Katherine Berhnardt, Katherine Bradford, Jackie Gendel, Liz Markus, and Rose Wylie) in a show entitled A New Subjectivity: Figurative Painting After 2000, curated by Jason Stopa. Staff who unpacked the works said the shipping materials were as varied as the content. The exhibit runs through Sunday, March 4 during regular gallery hours: Tuesday, noon-7p, Wed-Sun noon-5p. Walk-through available February 13 at 4:30pm and guided tours on Saturdays at 1m. All events are free and open to the public.