Salt Rock SP (Baltic) and Lazizah Bakery (Yantic) CT

30 07 2019

Cherry and I continue on the Sky’s the Limit Challenge by finishing our ninth (of fourteen) hike

SALT ROCK STATE PARK (BALTIC)

Lazizah Bakery, yummy Mediterranean food in a charming location

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Dennis Hill SP (Norfolk) & Harriet Beecher Stowe Garden (Hartford)

16 07 2019

Another winning combination
Dennis Hill State Park, Norfolk
Pavillion


Gazebo

Lunch at the Cafe in Norfolk, with a view of Infinity Hall

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Historical gardens, Hartford
Largest magnolia tree in CT
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Kettletown SP (Southbury) and Glebe House/Jekyll Garden (Woodbury) CT

10 07 2019

Our next DEEP Sky’s the Challenge site: Kettletown State Park in Southbury.

We also stopped at the Glebe House/Gertrude Jekyll Garden:

Lunch at Leo’s “Fit for a King”





Harkness, Rocky Neck, and Flo Griswold

3 07 2019

Gorgeous day to hit a few DEEP Sky’s the Limit and CT Historical Garden sites

HARKNESS STATE PARK (a DEEP Sky’s the Limit and CT Historical Garden site)
Waterford, CT

Beautiful natural features on our walk

The Gardens were in great form

ROCKY NECK STATE PARK (DEEP Sky’s the Limit site)
Niantic, CT

Sweet walk along marshes and vistas

(Lunch at the newly reopened HALLMARKS in Old Lyme; excellent ice cream)

FLORENCE GRISWOLD MUSEUM (CT Historical Garden site)
Old Lyme

Gardens were lovely


Fascinating exhibit (text below from Flo Griwold website)
June 1–September 8, 2019
Fragile Earth: The Naturalist Impulse in Contemporary Art
Four leading contemporary artists, Mark Dion, James Prosek, Jennifer Angus, and Courtney Mattison will create installations that reflect the vulnerability of our natural world in conversation with the landscape and historic structures of the Florence Griswold Museum. By bringing to the site artists who make natural history their medium, Fragile Earth will illustrate the continued relevance of ecology and nature conservation to contemporary artistic practice and showcase the persuasive and powerful role artists play in advocating for the preservation of our earth by bringing their perspective to natural science.





Pierrepont SP, Ridgefield; Heibeck’s Stand and Weir Farm NHS, Wilton

30 08 2018

24 August 2018

Cherry and I head to our penultimate DEEP Sky’s the Challenge hike: Seth Low Pierrepoint State Park!

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(text from DEEP website):  Seth Low Pierrepont State Park Reserve was a gift  to the Connecticut State Park and Forest Commission from Seth Low Pierrepont upon his death in 1956.  Mr. Pierrepont was a millionaire and ex-diplomat who served as a United States official in Lisbon, Rome, Paris, Santiago and Chile.  He also worked as chief of the American Division of the State Department.  Mr. Pierrepont purchased the estate from the Scott family in the early 1930’s.

Then lunch of hotdogs and homemade ice cream at Cherry’s good find: Heibeck’s Stand (along with their adjacent owned garage bathrooms!) (text from their website): The History of Heibeck’s began when George and Katherine Dlhy (pronounced Delhee) Heibeck moved to Georgetown in 1931. Katherine (known as Dodo by many) cooked in her own kitchen and served home cooked lunches in the two front rooms of the main building. She made her own pastries, pies, and cakes. The office employees at the Gilbert and Bennett Wire Mill were regular customers. As soon as they moved to Georgetown, they started improvements to the property, adding redwood log siding and a porch to the main building, and started building Heibeck’s Stand, which was originally located about forty feet from the main building and then later moved and attached to the main building where it is today.

And finally a quick visit to the Weir Farm National Historic Site gardens where I received my note card gift. (text from their website): A National Park for the Arts: Visit the home and studio of America’s most beloved Impressionist, J. Alden Weir, and walk in the footsteps of generations of world-class artists. Set amidst more than 60 acres of painterly woods, fields, and waterways, you’ll soon see why Weir described his home as the “Great Good Place.” Weir’s farm is a national legacy to American Impressionism, the creative spirit, and historic preservation.

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Posters of CT Historic Gardens by various artists made into note cards

Hard to believe but we have only one more hike! It’s a tough one, too. We will wait until it cools down in September to finish up.





DEEP #12: Sunny Brook State Park/Vientiane Thai Restaurant, Torrington CT

9 08 2018

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We just finished DEEP site #12, and it’s our twelfth hike of the 14–only two more to go!!!

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Interesting cairns along the creek

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Fungus among us

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Crossing the creek

Lunch at Vientiane Thai Restaurant — yummy

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River Highlands State Park, Cromwell CT

25 07 2018

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(Text from DEEP website) Where once there were farm fields and pastures, today there is a totally wooded, wonderfully situated, twenty-first century state park. Dedicated in 2001, this recent addition to the park system preserves 177 acres of ecologically important Connecticut River frontage. Tucked into a growing suburban landscape, River Highlands has escaped development to provide a quiet refuge with a wonderful view.

IMG_5659Lush with mixed woodlands dominated by oak, beech, and white pine, the hilly topography ranges in elevation from about 15 feet above sea level by the river to over 150 feet at the northern and southern high spots on the bluffs.

The most level area, or at least the most gently sloping, is at the park entrance on Field Road. It was here, and to the north, that pasture and field once flourished. Today the woodlands have taken over and the wetland systems have rebuilt themselves offering the visitor a true glimpse of the tranquility of the Eastern Forests.

IMG_5664But the real asset of the park is the view from the bluffs it protects. The Connecticut River, beautiful from so many locations, is at its best here. The bluffs are highest at the northern end of the park rising 130 feet above the water, and the view is ample reward for the hike to get there.

The are many trails in the park to lead the hiker across wooden bridges, over streams, along the 150 foot high bluff, or down to the water’s edge past a unique geologic feature known as the blowhole. Here one can hear the wind as it whistles past the bluffs. The Native Americans came to listen to the “wind being caught by the spirit of the earth.” When the colonists arrived they called it Devil’s Blowhole, believing it was an act of Satan. Sailors knew it as an area of quick winds as the park is just upstream of one of the tightest bends on the lower river.

 

Lunch at Ambrosia, Cromwell

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